Italian Setter

Italian Setter

As one of the world's oldest gun dogs, the Italian Setter's heritage dates back to the Middle Ages. The ancient pointer was prevalent and highly regarded in northern Italy throughout the Renaissance era for hunting game birds. The orange and white variety originated in the mountainous Italian region of Piedmont, and the heavier, chestnut and brown variety originated in the region of Lombardy. The dog’s skills adapted over the ages, from the days when hunting was carried out with nets or falcons through present day hunting with guns. In 1949, the Italian Kennel Club established the first breed standards. The United Kennel Club recognized the Italian setter in 2006, and procedural steps have begun toward earning future recognition in the American Kennel Club.

The lean, muscular physique of an Italian setter stands 22 to 26 inches tall at the shoulder and weighs 50 to 90 pounds. The dog has a long muzzle with pendulous lips, and his ears are long and droopy. The Italian setter’s coat is short and smooth, and the color may be white, orange, chestnut or white with orange or chestnut patches, speckles or ticking. Tails were once routinely docked shortly after birth to a length of six to eight inches, but this practice has diminished. An increasing number of Italian setters are seen carrying their natural long, thick and tapered tails.

Personality

If you are an avid hunting enthusiast who desires a gentle and devoted companion for your family, the Italian setter may be the dog that you have been searching for. The breed has proven its hunting capabilities as a pointer and gun dog through the ages. With adequate exercise and mental stimulation, the Italian setter has also demonstrated his loving qualities as an adored canine family member. Italian setters are strongly bonded to their families, and they are very gentle and affectionate. They get along exceptionally well with children. They get along with other dogs, but they are not good companions for cats and other small pets since their hunting instincts perceive these animals as prey. When trained and socialized early, Italian setters are outgoing and friendly. The Italian setter is intelligent and willing to please his owner, but training can be challenging if the dog’s focus is captivated by something other than the task at hand at that moment. Italian setters are alert, making them good watchdogs. The Italian setter is energetic and athletic, thriving on vigorous daily exercise. This is not an ideal breed for apartment living. The Italian setter is an excellent choice for families that enjoy regular hiking, hunting and other outdoor adventure pursuits.

Breed Characteristics

Life Span:12 - 13 years
Nicknames:Bracco Italiano, Italian Pointer, Piedmontese Pointer, Lombard Pointer, Italian Pointing dog

Italian Setter Build Information

The lean, muscular physique of an Italian setter stands 22 to 26 inches tall at the shoulder and weighs 50 to 90 pounds. The dog has a long muzzle with pendulous lips, and his ears are long and droopy. The Italian setter’s coat is short and smooth, and the color may be white, orange, chestnut or white with orange or chestnut patches, speckles or ticking. Tails were once routinely docked shortly after birth to a length of six to eight inches, but this practice has diminished. An increasing number of Italian setters are seen carrying their natural long, thick and tapered tails.

Size:Large

Behaviour and Personality

If you are an avid hunting enthusiast who desires a gentle and devoted companion for your family, the Italian setter may be the dog that you have been searching for. The breed has proven its hunting capabilities as a pointer and gun dog through the ages. With adequate exercise and mental stimulation, the Italian setter has also demonstrated his loving qualities as an adored canine family member. Italian setters are strongly bonded to their families, and they are very gentle and affectionate. They get along exceptionally well with children. They get along with other dogs, but they are not good companions for cats and other small pets since their hunting instincts perceive these animals as prey. When trained and socialized early, Italian setters are outgoing and friendly. The Italian setter is intelligent and willing to please his owner, but training can be challenging if the dog’s focus is captivated by something other than the task at hand at that moment. Italian setters are alert, making them good watchdogs. The Italian setter is energetic and athletic, thriving on vigorous daily exercise. This is not an ideal breed for apartment living. The Italian setter is an excellent choice for families that enjoy regular hiking, hunting and other outdoor adventure pursuits.

Activity Level:Very active
Affection Level:Affectionate
Kid Friendliness:Kid friendly

Appearance

The smooth coat of an Italian setter requires minimal grooming effort. They do shed considerably, so a quick weekly brushing will help to minimize the shedding around the house. It will also help to maintain healthy skin and a lustrous coat. The ears should be inspected frequently and kept clean to prevent ear infections, and the teeth should be brushed several times each week to maintain oral and overall good health.

Shedding:Little
Grooming:Low Maintenance

Italian Setter Common Health Conditions

Some health conditions to which the Italian setter is prone include hip dysplasia, elbow dysplasia, anesthetic sensitivity, entropion and ectropion.

Italian Setter Pet Insurance

When adding a dog or cat to your family you want to make sure your pet is happy, healthy and protected. During its lifetime your pet is exposed to many illnesses and diseases and some breeds are affected by a congenital disease which is a condition existing at birth. At these moments when your pet is ill or maybe needs surgery, you want to be protected for the unexpected and high veterinarian costs.

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Breed Talents and Facts

The Italian setter originated in Italy. The Italian setter is also called a bracco Italiano, an Italian pointer, a Piedmontese pointer, a Lombard pointer and an Italian pointing dog. The Italian setter is an intelligent, sociable, affectionate and devoted family member with strong hunting instincts and a love of outdoor physical activity. The Italian setter stands 22 to 26 inches tall and weighs 50 to 90 pounds. The Italian setter has a moderate energy level. The Italian setter requires minimal grooming. The average lifespan for an Italian setter is 10 to 12 years.

Training:Easy