Prague Ratter

Prague Ratter

The Prague Ratter is best known as being the smallest dog breed in the world. By breed standard, size is measured by height, not by weight. (If the standard was the latter, the Chihuahua would be the smallest.) The Prague Ratter is named after the capital of the Czech Republic, its home country. The Czechs and Slovaks—native to the area once known as Czechoslovakia—selectively bred the dog as a non-utilitarian, companion pet. Ratters were so named because they were primarily used as rat catchers in households. By the time the Polish king Boleslaw II requested for two Ratters in the mid-11th century, the dog had become an established breed. However, they have never been popular outside central Europe, and they had declined in popularity by the end of the 19th century. The Prague Ratter enjoyed a renaissance of sorts beginning from the early 1980s.

The Prague Ratter is typically 7 to 9 inches (19 to 22 centimeters) in height and 2 to 6 pounds (1 to 3 kilograms) in weight. The dog has a lean, delicate body wrapped in thin skin. The short coat consists of thin, glossy fur; and it usually has a black or tan color. There are other colors, however: blue and tan, brown and tan, red and merle, yellow, and lilac and tan. The head includes a narrow and fox-like muzzle, and it is supported by a moderately long and narrow neck.

Personality

Due to its size, the Prague Ratter is perfect for apartment life or small living areas, although it cannot stand the cold. Also, it can develop Small Dog Syndrome if not trained properly or made to understand its station in life. Its rat killing lineage ensures that the Prague Ratter is very alert and quick, and that it has a very strong sense of smell.

Breed Characteristics

Life Span:12 - 14 years
Nicknames:Prazsky Krysarik

Prague Ratter Build Information

The Prague Ratter is typically 7 to 9 inches (19 to 22 centimeters) in height and 2 to 6 pounds (1 to 3 kilograms) in weight. The dog has a lean, delicate body wrapped in thin skin. The short coat consists of thin, glossy fur; and it usually has a black or tan color. There are other colors, however: blue and tan, brown and tan, red and merle, yellow, and lilac and tan. The head includes a narrow and fox-like muzzle, and it is supported by a moderately long and narrow neck.

Size:Toy

Behaviour and Personality

Due to its size, the Prague Ratter is perfect for apartment life or small living areas, although it cannot stand the cold. Also, it can develop Small Dog Syndrome if not trained properly or made to understand its station in life. Its rat killing lineage ensures that the Prague Ratter is very alert and quick, and that it has a very strong sense of smell.

Activity Level:Active
Affection Level:Very affectionate
Kid Friendliness:Kid friendly (must be supervised)

Appearance

Thanks to its average shedding and smooth, short-haired coat, the Prague Ratter requires basic grooming: an occasional brush or a wipe with a damp cloth. Owners should keep the nails trimmed and regularly check the ears.

Shedding:Moderate
Grooming:Low maintenance

Prague Ratter Common Health Conditions

The Prague Ratter is susceptible to patellar luxation, a condition that often occurs with small dog breeds. Their small, tiny legs in particular are prone to breaking easily. Some Ratters might retain baby teeth, which would have to be pulled to prevent future dental problems.

Prague Ratter Pet Insurance

When adding a dog or cat to your family you want to make sure your pet is happy, healthy and protected. During its lifetime your pet is exposed to many illnesses and diseases and some breeds are affected by a congenital disease which is a condition existing at birth. At these moments when your pet is ill or maybe needs surgery, you want to be protected for the unexpected and high veterinarian costs.

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Breed Talents and Facts

The term “Prague Ratter” is the English translation of the dog's original Czech name, Prazsky Krysarik. The Prague Ratter is not recognized by any major kennel club. The Prague Ratter Club of America is the only organization that documents the breed, including keeping a studbook of lineage for dogs in the United States. Typically dogs from this breed live to be around 12 to 14 years.

Training:Easy