Tyrolean Hound

Tyrolean Hound

The Tyrolean Hound is a dog breed that comes from Tyrol, a federal state in the western region of Austria. This dog breed is extremely rare, with only a few of its variants still in existence. The ancestor of the Tyrolean Hound is the Celtic Hound, an ancient and semi-mythic dog from Gaelic Ireland. The dog was used as early as the 16th century by the Holy Roman emperor Maximilian I; at that time it was known as the Bracke Hound. Tyrol residents began control breeding in around 1860. In 1896, breeders set the standard for the dog, which by then was being used for hunting hare and fox in the woods and mountains. The Tyrolean Hound also functioned as a bloodhound, meaning that it tracked wounded game. At the turn of the century, there were many varieties of the hound, and official recognition came in 1906. By the beginning of the 21st century, however, only two variants remained: the red one and the black-and-tan.

Often described as a medium-sized dog, the Tyrolean Hound has a long rectangular trunk, deep and moderately broad chest, and a straight and firm back. The forequarters largely consists of sloping upper arms and straight legs, while the hindquarters features broad and muscular thighs. The dog has a dense double coat, which is usually red or black-and-tan. However, some dogs might have white markings. The broad and slightly arched head features a black nose on a moderately deep and straight muzzle, dark eyes that are large and round without being deeply set, and broad ears that are set on high and rounded on the ends. The long tail is set high; a thick-coated, brush-like tail is preferred. Males stand at 17 to 19.5 inches (43 to 50 centimeters), while females are around 16.5 to 19 inches (42 to 48 centimeters).

Personality

Blessed with a fine nose and an amazing sense of direction, the Tyrolean Hound is an excellent hunter that can follow a trail independent of its master. It is also a passionate and very active dog. Thus, it is better suited for larger living spaces than apartment life, and daily exercise and activity should be greatly encouraged. It is generally receptive to humans and other dogs, although it requires a strong and assertive owner to keep it in line.

Breed Characteristics

Life Span:12 -14 years
Nicknames:Tinolen Bracke, Tyroler Bracke

Tyrolean Hound Build Information

Often described as a medium-sized dog, the Tyrolean Hound has a long rectangular trunk, deep and moderately broad chest, and a straight and firm back. The forequarters largely consists of sloping upper arms and straight legs, while the hindquarters features broad and muscular thighs. The dog has a dense double coat, which is usually red or black-and-tan. However, some dogs might have white markings. The broad and slightly arched head features a black nose on a moderately deep and straight muzzle, dark eyes that are large and round without being deeply set, and broad ears that are set on high and rounded on the ends. The long tail is set high; a thick-coated, brush-like tail is preferred. Males stand at 17 to 19.5 inches (43 to 50 centimeters), while females are around 16.5 to 19 inches (42 to 48 centimeters).

Size:Medium

Behaviour and Personality

Blessed with a fine nose and an amazing sense of direction, the Tyrolean Hound is an excellent hunter that can follow a trail independent of its master. It is also a passionate and very active dog. Thus, it is better suited for larger living spaces than apartment life, and daily exercise and activity should be greatly encouraged. It is generally receptive to humans and other dogs, although it requires a strong and assertive owner to keep it in line.

Activity Level:Very active
Affection Level:Affectionate
Kid Friendliness:Very friendly

Appearance

With its dense double coat, the Tyrolean Hound might require a considerable amount of grooming. Frequent brushing and combining would keep the hair from getting tangled and give the dog an overall appealing appearance.

Shedding:Little
Grooming:Medium maintenance

Tyrolean Hound Common Health Conditions

There are no known major health or hereditary issues regarding the Tyrolean Hound.

Tyrolean Hound Pet Insurance

When adding a dog or cat to your family you want to make sure your pet is happy, healthy and protected. During its lifetime your pet is exposed to many illnesses and diseases and some breeds are affected by a congenital disease which is a condition existing at birth. At these moments when your pet is ill or maybe needs surgery, you want to be protected for the unexpected and high veterinarian costs.

Get a Free Pet Insurance Quote

Breed Talents and Facts

The United Kennel Club (UKC) recognized the Tyrolean Hound in 2006. The dog breed is also known as the Tinolen Bracke or Tyroler Bracke. The standard for the short-legged variant of the breed was deleted in 1944. Its life expectancy is currently unknown.

Training:Easy to train