Alaskan Malamute

Alaskan Malamute

As the name implies, the Alaskan Malamute originates in Alaska. The sled dog is a descendent of the Arctic wolf. An Alaskan tribe, called the Mahlemuts, was the first group to raise this breed of dog. The breed can be traced back about 3000 years, when they were used as a form of transportation, pulling sleds across the snow. The Alaskan Malamute was used not only for transportation, but to haul goods and supplies from shop to home. The breed has amazing tenacity, a fabulous sense of direction, and is incredibly loyal. The Alaskan Malamute is related to the American Eskimo dog, the Siberian husky, and the Samoyed. The breed is still utilized in Alaska today, but it has gained popularity in other parts of the world thanks, in part, to its striking good looks. You can find Malamutes participating in dog sports like carting, sledding, racing, weight pulling, and aiding in search and rescue.

The Alaskan Malamute has a wolf-like appearance, with a powerful build and heavy bones that enable it to carry and pull heavy loads. Alaskan Malamutes have thick double coats protecting them from the cold. The oater coat is think and coarse, while the undercoat is dense and wooly. This breed should be groomed regularly because they are heavy shedders.

Personality

Because of its wolf-like appearance, many people assume the Alaskan Malamute to be a good guard dog. But the Alaskan Malamute is more of a gentle giant. This breed is very affectionate, friendly and sociable. They are very good with children and friendly towards other pets. Alaskan Malamutes need vigorous daily exercise in the form of runs or long walks, otherwise they can become frustrated and difficult.

Breed Characteristics

Type:Pure
Family:Spitz
Function:Working
Origin:United States
Preferred Climate:Cold
Group:Working
Life Span:12-15 Years
Nicknames:Mal, Mally
Hypoallergenic:No

Alaskan Malamute Build Information

The Alaskan Malamute has a wolf-like appearance, with a powerful build and heavy bones that enable it to carry and pull heavy loads. Alaskan Malamutes have thick double coats protecting them from the cold. The oater coat is think and coarse, while the undercoat is dense and wooly. This breed should be groomed regularly because they are heavy shedders.

Size:Large
Length (Male):22-27 in.
Length (Female):22-24 in.
Weight:> 65 lbs
Litter Size:5 - 10 Puppies
Tail Dock or Crop:No

Behaviour and Personality

Because of its wolf-like appearance, many people assume the Alaskan Malamute to be a good guard dog. But the Alaskan Malamute is more of a gentle giant. This breed is very affectionate, friendly and sociable. They are very good with children and friendly towards other pets. Alaskan Malamutes need vigorous daily exercise in the form of runs or long walks, otherwise they can become frustrated and difficult.

Activity Level:Very Active
Affection Level:Very Affectionate
Aggressiveness Level:Moderate
Barking:Moderate
Dominating or Submissive?:None
Energy Level:Very Active
Good to Other Pets:Moderate Friendly
Guardian Skills:Yes
Independant:Yes
Kid Friendliness:Friendly

Appearance

The Alaskan Malamute does not need professional grooming as a rule. Some owners, especially those in hot climates, choose to have their dogs during the summer. The thick double coat needs to be brushed regularly to cut down on shedding. People who are opposed to having clumps of dog hair tumbling through their home should not have an Alaskan Malamute. The breed has a dense undercoat that drops in clumps twice each year. Like any dog, this breed needs regular attention to its ears, toenails and teeth. Begin cleaning your puppy’s ears and teeth early to get it used to the process. Nails should be kept short at all times.

Colors:Black, Gray, Red, Sable
Shedding:Constant
Grooming:Medium Maintenance
Coat Type:Dense

Alaskan Malamute Common Health Conditions

The breed is not prone to many health issues. Like any large breed of dog, Alaskan Malamutes are prone to hip dysplasia, elbow dysplasia, and joint problems. Because of their thick coats, they can easily overheat in hot weather. Special care should be taken to keep your dog cool during warm months. Large and giant breeds of dog are prone to bloat, and the Alaskan Malamute is no exception. Bloat is a life-threatening issue that occurs when the stomach fills with air and twists over on itself. Do not feed your malamute large meals, do not let it exercise directly after eating, and do not let it gulp large amounts of water.

Alaskan Malamute Pet Insurance

When adding a dog or cat to your family you want to make sure your pet is happy, healthy and protected. During its lifetime your pet is exposed to many illnesses and diseases and some breeds are affected by a congenital disease which is a condition existing at birth. At these moments when your pet is ill or maybe needs surgery, you want to be protected for the unexpected and high veterinarian costs.

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Breed Talents and Facts

When socialized early, the breed can get along well with other animals. The malamute is loyal to its family and gentle with children. Due to its need for exercise and movement, the breed is not suitable for apartments.

Training:Moderately easy to train
Hunting Companion:No
Jolly for Jogging:Yes
Sighting Capabilities:No
Ideal for Tracking:No
Retrieving Skills:No
Pointing Breed:No
Herding Skills:No
Dutiful Watchdog:No
Security Guard Capable:Yes
Police Performer:No
Wet Water rescues:No
Assist Disable Owners:No
Dog Sledding:Yes
Able to Perform Dog Carting:Yes
Agile/Zippy:No
Fun with Lure Coursing:No
Obedient:No
Possible Schutzhund Work:No
Trainable for Tricks:No