Great Pyrenees

Great Pyrenees

The Great Pyrenees originated in France's Pyrenees Mountains. The white dogs were utilized for many centuries to guard and protect flocks of sheep from bears, wolves and other predators. Later, the Great Pyrenees dogs served as chateau guards for French nobility, and the breed was highly admired by King Louis XIV. Marquis de Lafayette was the man responsible for bringing the first Great Pyrenees to the United States. In 1933, the American Kennel Club recognized the Great Pyrenees as a member of the working group.

The large and noble Great Pyrenees stands at a height of 25 to 32 inches at the shoulder and weighs 85 to 115 pounds. The Great Pyrenees is covered with a double coat of white, which may exhibit markings of gray, tan, badger or reddish brown. The hairs of the undercoat are wooly, and the outer coat's hair is thick, coarse and moderately long. A mane wraps around the neck and shoulders, and the hairs on the backs of the legs are feathered. The ears hang downward, and the plumed tail often resembles a shepherd's crook where the end curves. The Greater Pyrenees is a giant dog that was bred to guard livestock in the mountainous regions of the Pyrenees. It's athletic, muscular, and agile enabling it to navigate rough terrain. It's equipped with a furry coat that protects it from cold mountain nights. It has a double coat with a soft, woolly undercoat and a thick, coarse outercoat. It sheds quite a lot and needs regular brushing and clipping.

Personality

The Great Pyrenees is a patient, gentle dog that loves children. It will also get along with other household pets. As a natural guardian, the Great Pyrenees is protective and devoted to its family, but is reserved toward strangers. Early socialization is important. The Great Pyrenees is an intelligent worker that must be kept mentally occupied and stimulated. The Great Pyrenees requires a daily walk for exercise, and the dog makes an ideal hiking companion during the cooler months. The breed does not thrive in high temperatures. The Greater Pyrenees is a gentle, friendly and kind dog breed that has moderate exercise needs which can be met with daily walks. They are lazy in the sense that they like to rest and snuggle up indoors. They are intelligent and loyal and can be very protective of their family. Sometimes they are stubborn and territorial. They are good with children but may not be suitable companions for children because of their size. They are suspicious of strangers and can get aggressive towards other dogs.

Breed Characteristics

Type:Pure
Family:Livestock guardian
Function:Working
Origin:Europe
Preferred Climate:Any Climate
Group:Working
Life Span:10-12 Years
Nicknames:Chien de Montagne des Pyrenees, Pyrenean dog, Pyrenean mountain dog, Patou, Pyr
Hypoallergenic:No

Great Pyrenees Build Information

The large and noble Great Pyrenees stands at a height of 25 to 32 inches at the shoulder and weighs 85 to 115 pounds. The Great Pyrenees is covered with a double coat of white, which may exhibit markings of gray, tan, badger or reddish brown. The hairs of the undercoat are wooly, and the outer coat's hair is thick, coarse and moderately long. A mane wraps around the neck and shoulders, and the hairs on the backs of the legs are feathered. The ears hang downward, and the plumed tail often resembles a shepherd's crook where the end curves. The Greater Pyrenees is a giant dog that was bred to guard livestock in the mountainous regions of the Pyrenees. It's athletic, muscular, and agile enabling it to navigate rough terrain. It's equipped with a furry coat that protects it from cold mountain nights. It has a double coat with a soft, woolly undercoat and a thick, coarse outercoat. It sheds quite a lot and needs regular brushing and clipping.

Size:Giant
Length (Male):22-27 in.
Length (Female):22-24 in.
Weight:> 65 lbs
Litter Size:5 - 10 Puppies
Tail Dock or Crop:No

Behaviour and Personality

The Great Pyrenees is a patient, gentle dog that loves children. It will also get along with other household pets. As a natural guardian, the Great Pyrenees is protective and devoted to its family, but is reserved toward strangers. Early socialization is important. The Great Pyrenees is an intelligent worker that must be kept mentally occupied and stimulated. The Great Pyrenees requires a daily walk for exercise, and the dog makes an ideal hiking companion during the cooler months. The breed does not thrive in high temperatures. The Greater Pyrenees is a gentle, friendly and kind dog breed that has moderate exercise needs which can be met with daily walks. They are lazy in the sense that they like to rest and snuggle up indoors. They are intelligent and loyal and can be very protective of their family. Sometimes they are stubborn and territorial. They are good with children but may not be suitable companions for children because of their size. They are suspicious of strangers and can get aggressive towards other dogs.

Activity Level:Moderately Active
Affection Level:Moderate Affectionate
Aggressiveness Level:Moderate
Barking:Noisy
Dominating or Submissive?:Dominating
Energy Level:Moderately Active
Good to Other Pets:Friendly
Guardian Skills:Yes
Independant:Yes
Kid Friendliness:Friendly

Appearance

The coat of a Great Pyrenees is not susceptible to matting, but it sheds heavily. Thoroughly brushing out the coat at least once a week will help to collect some of the dead hair onto the brush to reduce shed accumulation in the home. Great Pyrenees are prone to ear infections, which can be minimized with weekly inspections of the ears, cleaning them as necessary and keeping them dry. Brushing the teeth at least once every other day will minimize tartar buildup, prevent periodontal disease and maintain good overall internal health.

Colors:White
Shedding:Seasonal
Grooming:High Maintenance
Coat Type:Dense

Great Pyrenees Common Health Conditions

The Great Pyrenees lives an average lifespan of 10 to 12 years. Some orthopedic problems to be aware of in the Great Pyrenees include hip dysplasia, patellar luxation, panosteitis, osteochondrosis dissecans and osteosarcoma. Eye problems of the Great Pyrenees include progressive retinal atrophy, cataracts and entropion. Other health conditions noted in the breed include bloat, or gastric torsion, tricuspid valve dysplasia and spinal muscular atrophy.

Great Pyrenees Pet Insurance

When adding a dog or cat to your family you want to make sure your pet is happy, healthy and protected. During its lifetime your pet is exposed to many illnesses and diseases and some breeds are affected by a congenital disease which is a condition existing at birth. At these moments when your pet is ill or maybe needs surgery, you want to be protected for the unexpected and high veterinarian costs.

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Breed Talents and Facts

For a dog that will protect the family and homestead, tag along on hikes through snow-covered trails and occupy the couch alongside your children, the loving and devoted Great Pyrenees is an ideal choice for a household companion. The Great Pyrenees originated in the Pyrenees Mountains in France. Other names for the Great Pyrenees include chien de Montagne des Pyrenees, Pyrenean dog, Pyrenean mountain dog, Patou and Pyr. The Great Pyrenees is a patient, gentle and affectionate family companion that will guard its home and family members. The Great Pyrenees stands 25 to 32 inches tall and weighs 85 to 115 pounds. Great Pyrenees has a moderate energy level. The Great Pyrenees requires moderate grooming. The average lifespan for a Great Pyrenees is 10 to 12 years.

Training:Moderately easy to train
Hunting Companion:No
Jolly for Jogging:No
Sighting Capabilities:No
Ideal for Tracking:No
Retrieving Skills:No
Pointing Breed:No
Herding Skills:No
Dutiful Watchdog:Yes
Security Guard Capable:Yes
Police Performer:No
Wet Water rescues:No
Assist Disable Owners:No
Dog Sledding:Yes
Able to Perform Dog Carting:Yes
Agile/Zippy:No
Fun with Lure Coursing:No
Obedient:No
Possible Schutzhund Work:No
Trainable for Tricks:No