Greater Swiss Mountain Dog

Greater Swiss Mountain Dog

The greater Swiss mountain dog hails from the mountains of Switzerland. The breed was developed nearly 2,000 years ago as a working dog for pulling carts, guarding farmsteads and herding livestock. During the industrial era, the dogs were swapped out for mechanical labor. By 1900, the breed was facing extinction. By 1910, a renewed interest in reviving the breed surged. In 1995, the American Kennel Club recognized the greater Swiss mountain dog as a member of the working group.

The greater Swiss mountain dog is a gentle giant that stands 23.5 to 28.5 inches tall at the shoulder and weighs in at 85 to 140 pounds. The dog is covered with a thick and dense double coat, and the topcoat is black with white and rust markings. The body is sturdy, strong and powerful. The ears flip downward, and the long tail is also carried downward. The Greater Swiss Mountain Dog is a working dog and has the body for it. It is large, strong and muscular. It has a thick double coat with a dense undercoat and a furry outercoat. It tends to shed so frequent brushing is necessary.

Personality

The greater Swiss mountain dog is a confident, alert and natural watchdog. The dog is devoted to its family and gets along well with children and other household pets. However, the breed has a lengthy duration of exuberant puppy behavior, which may be overzealous for smaller children. As an adult, the gentle companion is laid back, but its herding instincts may kick in around certain family members. A brisk daily walk will satisfy its exercise needs, but the greater Swiss mountain dog revels in spending time outdoors during the cooler months. The dog makes an excellent companion to take along on autumn and winter hikes. This is a large dog breed that is good-natured and loyal. It is peaceful and calm and has moderate exercise needs that can be met with long daily walks or fun games. It can sometimes be territorial and strong-willed. It is gentle with children but not very playful. It's friendly towards other dogs but may be reserved with strangers.

Breed Characteristics

Type:Pure
Family:Mastiffs
Function:Working
Origin:Europe
Preferred Climate:Cold
Group:Working
Life Span:8-9 Years
Nicknames:Swissy, Bouvier Suisse, large Swiss mountain dog, grosser Schweizer sennenhund
Hypoallergenic:No

Greater Swiss Mountain Dog Build Information

The greater Swiss mountain dog is a gentle giant that stands 23.5 to 28.5 inches tall at the shoulder and weighs in at 85 to 140 pounds. The dog is covered with a thick and dense double coat, and the topcoat is black with white and rust markings. The body is sturdy, strong and powerful. The ears flip downward, and the long tail is also carried downward. The Greater Swiss Mountain Dog is a working dog and has the body for it. It is large, strong and muscular. It has a thick double coat with a dense undercoat and a furry outercoat. It tends to shed so frequent brushing is necessary.

Size:Giant
Length (Male):22-27 in.
Length (Female):22-24 in.
Weight:> 65 lbs
Litter Size:5 - 10 Puppies
Tail Dock or Crop:No

Behaviour and Personality

The greater Swiss mountain dog is a confident, alert and natural watchdog. The dog is devoted to its family and gets along well with children and other household pets. However, the breed has a lengthy duration of exuberant puppy behavior, which may be overzealous for smaller children. As an adult, the gentle companion is laid back, but its herding instincts may kick in around certain family members. A brisk daily walk will satisfy its exercise needs, but the greater Swiss mountain dog revels in spending time outdoors during the cooler months. The dog makes an excellent companion to take along on autumn and winter hikes. This is a large dog breed that is good-natured and loyal. It is peaceful and calm and has moderate exercise needs that can be met with long daily walks or fun games. It can sometimes be territorial and strong-willed. It is gentle with children but not very playful. It's friendly towards other dogs but may be reserved with strangers.

Activity Level:Moderately Active
Affection Level:Moderate Affectionate
Aggressiveness Level:Easy
Barking:Moderate
Dominating or Submissive?:Not Available
Energy Level:Moderately Active
Good to Other Pets:Friendly
Guardian Skills:Yes
Independant:Moderate
Kid Friendliness:Friendly

Appearance

The coat of a greater Swiss mountain dog is easy to maintain with a weekly brushing to remove dead hair and to restore its shine. Clean the ears as necessary and keep them dry to prevent ear infections, and brush the teeth every other day to prevent tartar buildup and periodontal disease.

Colors:Black, Rust, Tri-Color, White
Shedding:Moderate
Grooming:Low Maintenance
Coat Type:Dense

Greater Swiss Mountain Dog Common Health Conditions

Like many giant breeds, the average lifespan of a greater Swiss mountain dog is relatively short, ranging from seven to nine years. Be aware of some orthopedic problems that have been noted in the greater Swiss mountain dog, including hip and elbow dysplasia, panosteitis and shoulder osteochondritis dissecans. Greater Swiss mountain dogs are also prone to gastric torsion, or bloat. An eye condition called distichiasis has also been seen in the breed.

Greater Swiss Mountain Dog Pet Insurance

When adding a dog or cat to your family you want to make sure your pet is happy, healthy and protected. During its lifetime your pet is exposed to many illnesses and diseases and some breeds are affected by a congenital disease which is a condition existing at birth. At these moments when your pet is ill or maybe needs surgery, you want to be protected for the unexpected and high veterinarian costs.

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Breed Talents and Facts

For a dedicated sidekick on the hiking trails, a loving family member and a vigilant watchdog, consider the greater Swiss mountain dog. Although the dog’s lifespan is shorter than some other breeds, the greater Swiss mountain dog provides four years of exuberant puppyhood before reaching full maturity. The greater Swiss mountain dog originated in Switzerland. The greater Swiss mountain dog is also known as a Swissy, a bouvier Suisse, a large Swiss mountain dog and a grosser Schweizer sennenhund. The greater Swiss mountain dog is a loving and devoted family companion with strong watchdog instincts. The greater Swiss mountain dog stands 23,5 to 28,5 inches tall and weighs 85 to 140 pounds. The Greater Swiss mountain dog has a minimal energy level. Greater Swiss mountain dogs require minimal grooming. The average lifespan for a greater Swiss mountain dog is seven to nine years.

Training:Hard
Hunting Companion:No
Jolly for Jogging:Yes
Sighting Capabilities:No
Ideal for Tracking:Yes
Retrieving Skills:No
Pointing Breed:No
Herding Skills:No
Dutiful Watchdog:Yes
Security Guard Capable:Yes
Police Performer:No
Wet Water rescues:No
Assist Disable Owners:No
Dog Sledding:No
Able to Perform Dog Carting:Yes
Agile/Zippy:No
Fun with Lure Coursing:No
Obedient:Yes
Possible Schutzhund Work:No
Trainable for Tricks:No