Akita

Named for the Akita province in Japan, this breed dates back to the 1600s. Used originally to guard royalty in the county, it was used secondarily to hunt large game and fowl. What many people do not know is that Helen Keller was the person credited with introducing the breed to America. During a trip to Japan, Keller was presented with a puppy of her own that she named Kamikaze-go. Unfortunately, the dog passed away from distemper and was replaced by Kenzan-go, its older brother. More Akitas were brought to the United States after World War II. The American Akita breeding program started in 1956, producing dogs that were more robust than their Japanese kin.

The Akita has a big build with heavy bones, which reflects its original function as a hunting dog in deep snow. Akitas have thick, double coats consisting of dense undercoats and wooly outer coats giving them perfect insulation from the cold. They are low in maintenance when it comes to grooming, but need weekly brushing. Personality: The Akita is a very loyal and protective companion. It is an independent and stubborn dog, and may be domineering. The Akita dog needs lots of exercise on a daily basis in the form of running or long walks. They can be good and gentle with children if they were raised with them, but do not tolerate teasing. This breed is not always tolerant with other dogs and can be aggressive towards strangers.

Akita image
Breed Type
Pure
Origin
Asia
Family
Function
Life Span
10-14 Years
Hypoallergenic
No
Other Names
Akita ken, Japanese Akita, American Akita, Great Japanese Dog (Obsolete), Akita Inu, Akita

Akita Build Information

Size
Large
Length (Male)
19-25 in.
Length (Female)
18-20 in.
Weight
> 65 lbs
Litter Size
5 - 10 Puppies
Tail Dock or Crop
No
Preferred Climate
Moderate Cold

The Akita has a big build with heavy bones, which reflects its original function as a hunting dog in deep snow. Akitas have thick, double coats consisting of dense undercoats and wooly outer coats giving them perfect insulation from the cold. They are low in maintenance when it comes to grooming, but need weekly brushing.

Behaviour and Personality

Kid Friendliness
Affection Level
Activity Level
Energy Level
Independant
Good to Other Pets
Dominating or Submissive?
Guardian Skills
Barking
Aggressiveness Level

The Akita is a very loyal and protective companion. It is an independent and stubborn dog, and may be domineering. The Akita dog needs lots of exercise on a daily basis in the form of running or long walks. They can be good and gentle with children if they were raised with them, but do not tolerate teasing. This breed is not always tolerant with other dogs and can be aggressive towards strangers.

Appearance

Colors
Tan Brindle White
Shedding
Seasonal
Grooming
Low Maintenance
Coat Type
Fluffy

Grooming Akitas is not a difficult process. Potential owners should know that the Akita is a fairly heavy shedder. If you do not want hair in your house, this isn't the breed for you. Shedding is even heavier than normal two to three times per year. Daily brushing can help reduce the amount of hair you find covering your furniture.

Brushing also keeps the dog’s coat healthy.

At a minimum, your Akita will need to be bathed every few months. You can bathe your dog more often if you like. Toenails should be trimmed every four weeks, and ears should be cleaned weekly.

Breed's Talents and Facts

Training
Moderately easy to train
Hunting Companion
Yes
Jolly for Jogging
Yes
Sighting Capabilities
No
Ideal for Tracking
Yes
Retrieving Skills
No
Pointing Breed
No
Herding Skills
No
Dutiful Watchdog
Yes
Security Guard Capable
Yes
Police Performer
Yes
Wet Water rescues
No
Assist Disable Owners
No
Dog Sledding
Yes
Able to Perform Dog Carting
No
Agile/Zippy
No
Fun with Lure Coursing
No
Obedient
No
Possible Schutzhund Work
No
Trainable for Tricks
No
  • Bold and willful, the Akita is happiest as an only dog
  • Akitas are not recommended for first-time owners
  • Obedience training and socialization are required
  • Males tend to weigh between 85 and 130 pounds; females are slightly smaller
  • Daily, vigorous exercise is a must for this active working breed
  • Akitas are not typically recommended for families with young children

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Common Health Conditions in Akitas

Most Akitas are very healthy but, like any dog, the breed is prone to specific illnesses. These illnesses and conditions include hip dysplasia, gastric dilation volvulus, hypothyroidism, progressive retinal atrophy, and sebaceous adenitis. Of these illnesses, gastric dilation volvulus is also known as bloat. This is a condition that can cause death if not treated immediately. Bloat is a life-threatening condition in which the stomach fills with air and turns over on itself. To help prevent this, feed your Akita several small meals throughout the day, do not allow exercise immediately after a meal, and do not let your dog gulp large amounts of water.

Akita Pet Insurance

When adding a dog or cat to your family you want to make sure your pet is happy, healthy and protected. During its lifetime your pet is exposed to many illnesses and diseases and some breeds are affected by a congenital disease which is a condition existing at birth. At these moments when your pet is ill or maybe needs surgery, you want to be protected for the unexpected and high veterinarian costs.

Insure your Akita

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