Cane Corso

The Cane Corso falls under a category of large and muscular dogs collectively named Molosser. The name comes from Molossia, the location of an ancient Greek tribal state. The Cane Corso in particular is sometimes called the Neapolitan Mastiff, or the Italian Mastiff. However, it is smaller than most Mastiff breeds. The Cane Corso's ancestry is linked to the canis pugnax, which was used by the ancient Romans in war. The dog is most commonly associated with Southern Italy. In the olden days the Cane Corso was used in warfare and hunting. Another common use in the past was for waste management; in this capacity, the dogs transported garbage for disposal. Today the dog breed is still used for hunting; it is a top choice for wild boar and cougar hunters. Other common modern-day uses include working livestock (particularly cattle and swine) and acting as watchdogs. The Cane Corso is handsomely represented in Italy's art history, depicted in several paintings from the country.

The Cane Corso is a massive, powerful dog that has a heavy body with well-defined muscles. Its head is broad, massive with a broad, wide muzzle. Its ears are medium-sized, v-shaped and pendant. Corsi have short, dense coats that are usually fawn, black or red.

The Cane Corso is generally described as a noble, majestically built, and large-boned breed. According to the Fédération Cynologique Internationale—which is the international dog breed standards organization—the Cane Corso has a height of 24 to 28 inches at the withers. Males are generally taller than females. The weight range is around 99 to 110 pounds. The dog's most notable physical characteristic is the head. Large and imposing, the head features dark and slightly sunken eyes and equilateral triangular ears. The dog’s flat, sloping forehead converges to the flat and rectangular muzzle. The coat on the Cane Corso is short, coarse and thick: characteristics that make it waterproof. The most common colors are black and fawn, although some dogs have red or gray coats instead. In some cases, the dog might have some brindling, creating color variations like tigrato (black brindle) and Grigio Trigrato (grey brindle). Personality: Cane Corso, also called Corsi, are strong-willed dogs that are devoted and affectionate. They are very loyal but tend to have a mind of their own. They can also be dominant and territorial. This dog breed needs consistent and strong training from an early age. They need plenty of exercise to stay fit. The Cane Corso is a great family dog but may be more suitable for older children. They can get aggressive towards other dogs and stranger if they feel they represent a threat to their human families. The Cane Corso is very loyal to its owner and family, and it is easily trainable. Also, the dog is very suspicious of strangers due to its very high sense of protection.

Cane Corso image
Breed Type
Pure
Origin
Europe
Function
Life Span
10-12 Years
Hypoallergenic
No
Other Names
Italian Mastiff, Corsi, Cane Corso Italiano, Cane Corso

Cane Corso Build Information

Size
Medium
Length (Male)
22-27 in.
Length (Female)
22-24 in.
Weight
> 65 lbs
Litter Size
5 - 10 Puppies
Tail Dock or Crop
Both
Preferred Climate
Any Climate

The Cane Corso is a massive, powerful dog that has a heavy body with well-defined muscles. Its head is broad, massive with a broad, wide muzzle. Its ears are medium-sized, v-shaped and pendant. Corsi have short, dense coats that are usually fawn, black or red.

The Cane Corso is generally described as a noble, majestically built, and large-boned breed. According to the Fédération Cynologique Internationale—which is the international dog breed standards organization—the Cane Corso has a height of 24 to 28 inches at the withers. Males are generally taller than females. The weight range is around 99 to 110 pounds.

The dog's most notable physical characteristic is the head.

Large and imposing, the head features dark and slightly sunken eyes and equilateral triangular ears. The dog’s flat, sloping forehead converges to the flat and rectangular muzzle. The coat on the Cane Corso is short, coarse and thick: characteristics that make it waterproof. The most common colors are black and fawn, although some dogs have red or gray coats instead. In some cases, the dog might have some brindling, creating color variations like tigrato (black brindle) and Grigio Trigrato (grey brindle).

Behaviour and Personality

Kid Friendliness
Affection Level
Activity Level
Energy Level
Independant
Good to Other Pets
Dominating or Submissive?
Guardian Skills
Barking
Aggressiveness Level

Cane Corso, also called Corsi, are strong-willed dogs that are devoted and affectionate. They are very loyal but tend to have a mind of their own. They can also be dominant and territorial. This dog breed needs consistent and strong training from an early age. They need plenty of exercise to stay fit.

The Cane Corso is a great family dog but may be more suitable for older children.

They can get aggressive towards other dogs and stranger if they feel they represent a threat to their human families. The Cane Corso is very loyal to its owner and family, and it is easily trainable. Also, the dog is very suspicious of strangers due to its very high sense of protection.

Appearance

Colors
Black Blue Gray Fawn Gray Red
Shedding
Moderate
Grooming
Low Maintenance
Coat Type
Dense

Their coats require minimal grooming but they tend to slobber. Nail clipping, ear cleaning and bathing should be done when necessary.

Breed's Talents and Facts

Training
Moderately easy to train
Hunting Companion
Yes
Jolly for Jogging
Yes
Sighting Capabilities
No
Ideal for Tracking
No
Retrieving Skills
No
Pointing Breed
No
Herding Skills
No
Dutiful Watchdog
Yes
Security Guard Capable
Yes
Police Performer
Yes
Wet Water rescues
No
Assist Disable Owners
No
Dog Sledding
No
Able to Perform Dog Carting
Yes
Agile/Zippy
Yes
Fun with Lure Coursing
No
Obedient
Yes
Possible Schutzhund Work
Yes
Trainable for Tricks
Yes
  • The average Cane Corso has a life expectancy of 10 to 12 years
  • The Cane Corso is a giant molosser from Italy
  • Its name is derived from the Latin word “Cohors,” which means “guardian” and “protector”
  •  True to its naming, the Cane Corso has been used as a companion, guardian, and hunter in Italy for centuries

Are you a Cane Corso Parent?

Make your dog famous and share your pictures with our community!

Upload a Pet Photo

Leave a review of this Breed

Is this information incomplete? Help us improve this dog breed profile, by submitting your information here.

Common Health Conditions in Cane Corsos

The Cane Corso is susceptible to the main health issues associated with large dog breeds, particularly Mastiffs. Chief among them is hip dysplasia, which denotes the abnormal or faulty development of the hip. This condition can lead to the development of degenerative joint disease (or osteoarthritis), since hip dysplasia wears on the joints. Other common ailments of the Cane Corso include gastric torsion (or bloating) and eyelid abnormality.

Cane Corso Pet Insurance

When adding a dog or cat to your family you want to make sure your pet is happy, healthy and protected. During its lifetime your pet is exposed to many illnesses and diseases and some breeds are affected by a congenital disease which is a condition existing at birth. At these moments when your pet is ill or maybe needs surgery, you want to be protected for the unexpected and high veterinarian costs.

Insure your Cane Corso

Learn more about pet insurance here to keep your pet healthy and request your FREE Quote now!

Are you Cane Corso Breeder?

We have the most complete database with over 10,000 dog breeders in the USA! We would love to be in contact with you because we get many requests on our website of pet owners looking for this breed. You can contact us here to join our dog breeders directory now! We can help you find homes for your Cane Corso puppies. Register as a Breeder!

Our website does not take any position with or against designer dog breeds or mixed breeds. We also stay neutral about the buying or adoption of pets. Our main goal is to keep users informed about the dog breeds and the multiple options they might have when getting a new pet.
Get a Quote!

Get A FREE, No Obligation Pet Health Insurance Quote within 5 Minutes