Pet Insurance Washington (WA)

Pet Insurance Washington

Whether you live in Seattle or Olympia, pet owners all over Washington have learned the significance of pet insurance.

Reasons to Consider Pet Insurance in Washington

Pet insurance WA is a great idea for those living in the Evergreen State. Washington is known for its famous coastline. But as a pet owner, you need to be aware that digesting raw fish from the northwest pacific region of the United States can be harmful to your pet*.

Salmon, Trout, Lamprey, Sculpin, Redside Shiner, Shad, Sturgeon, Candlefish and the large-scale Sucker that spend some of the their lives in coastal streams and rivers and can be infected with the bacteria Neorickettsia helminthoeca*.

According to Jennifer Johns, DVM, PhD, DACVP, Neorickettsia helmonthoeca is a bacteria that is found in a parasitic flatworm called Nanophyetus salmincola. Nanophyetus salmincola, can survive in raw fish and once it is in contact with your dog’s intestinal tract, the larva escape and in doing so releases the bacteria. The bacteria then spreads via your pet’s blood system to the liver, brain, lungs and lymphoid tissue and causes hemorrhage, necrosis, and hyperplasia.

If not treated within two weeks of exposure to the bacteria, salmon poisoning disease is usually fatal. If your dog has become infected, within 6 to 10 days the following symptoms will show:

  • Fever, often greater than 104 F
  • Depression
  • Anorexia
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Nasal or eye discharge
  • Weight loss

If your dog is exhibiting the above symptoms and you know it has ingested raw fish, call your veterinarian immediately. If salmon poisoning disease is recognized in time, it is treatable. Your veterinarian will need to review a fecal sample to detect the parasite’s eggs or will need to collect a needle sample from your dog’s swollen lymph node. Many dog breeds respond well to treatment, since treatment consists of an antibiotic and a dewormer.

More About Pet Insurance in Washington

So whether, you live in Aberdeen or Zillah, pet insurance WA is a great investment in your pet’s health. For more information about pet insurance, visit www.petpremium.com. At petpremium.com, you can learn more about your pet’s health in our Pet Health Center.

* -Source: Salmon poisoning disease in dogs: a satisfying diagnosis., Johns JL., Vet J. 2011 Feb

 

Most Popular Dog Breeds in Washington

NOTE: Pet Premium does not currently have plans available in Washington.

Homemade Cat Food: Do’s and Don’ts

Cats are obligate carnivores and as such, they need a diet containing ONLY meat. What else does this mean? They should have a significant amount of protein from meat or fish, fatty acids, vitamins, minerals, water and taurine. Carbohydrates, or fillers, in very small amounts are okay; however, to provide the cat with energy and reduce the cost of the diet (but not necessary). In order to provide your cat with a healthy homemade cat food, there are a few other facts you should know.

Homemade Cat Food

Homemade Cat Food: Do’s

  • Follow the recipe exactly as it reads. Not following the recipe exactly as it reads can actually do more harm to your cat than good in regard to feeding a home-based diet
  • AVOID garlic, raisins, onions, raw egg whites and tomatoes!
  • Provide protein using chicken, beef, pork, liver or fish
  • Include a sufficient amount of fat

Homemade Cat Food: Don’ts

  • Do not include too many carbohydrates! The diet should be less than 10% carbohydrates in content.
  • Don’t forget taurine! If you do not include taurine, your furry feline friend will go blind!
  • Do not feed processed treats!
  • Do not try to feed your cat fruits and veggies! They are obligate carnivores remember, so they do not need these.

If you have any questions regarding homemade cat food or for your canine friend, our in-house pet nutritionist is available to assist you.

Amber Johnson, Animal Behaviorist

Miss Amber Johnson has many years of experience with pets and is a licensed cat and dog nutrition and behavior specialist. She currently collaborates with PetPremium where she counsels clients in pet behavior and nutrition. The statements made in this article are the personal opinions of Miss Amber Johnson and based on independent experiences and could be different from the opinions of PetPremium Pet health Insurance or any other pet health insurance provider.

How to Find the Best Puppy Food?

Choosing the best puppy food can be an extremely frustrating task. After all, there are so many choices! How do you even begin to choose? To begin, you should begin searching for foods which are high in meat-based protein, natural fats and oils. You should also search for foods which are low in carbohydrates or fillers. Of course you also need to look at the vitamins and minerals contained in various puppy foods. Find out more about ingredients in dog food.

How to Find the Best Puppy Food?

Complete in Essential Nutrients

The Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO) has determined the nutrients necessary for a puppy to remain at an optimal level of health. The AAFCO indicates a minimum of ten amino acids, twelve minerals and eleven vitamins to ensure puppies are healthy. In addition to this, the AAFCO have included a statement on every package of dog food to allow the pet owner to choose food wisely. How to read pet food labels?

What Makes it Good

The best puppy food will support your growing puppy. Puppies require more protein than adult dogs to support their growing bodies. DHA, a nutrient which is found in the mother’s milk to support vision and brain development, is also often included in puppy food. The best puppy food supports a puppy’s weak immune system and assists the immune system in advancing to adult stage.

Puppies have a delicate stomach which is also the reasoning for their food being significantly different than their adult counterparts. Their food must be palatable and easily digestible. Rice and oatmeal are found in the best puppy foods to support a puppy’s delicate stomach.

If you have any questions regarding the best puppy food, our in-house pet nutritionist is available to assist you.

Amber Johnson, Animal Behaviorist

Miss Amber Johnson has many years of experience with pets and is a licensed cat and dog nutrition and behavior specialist. She currently collaborates with PetPremium where she counsels clients in pet behavior and nutrition. The statements made in this article are the personal opinions of Miss Amber Johnson and based on independent experiences and could be different from the opinions of PetPremium Pet health Insurance or any other pet health insurance provider.

Urinary Cat Food: Why?

Urinary cat food is designed for cats who are at risk or have urinary tract disease. The veterinarian is likely to prescribe this type of food for you if he feels the need. There are several reasons for urinary tract diets being prescribed when cats have urinary problems.

Urinary Cat Food

When and Why to Feed your Cat Urinary Food?

Urinary tract diets for cats is prescribed due to its ability to lower urinary pH in cats. Urinary cat food also contains lower amounts of magnesium to assist in maintaining urinary tract health and reducing risk for feline urinary tract infections. Why does pH matter? If the pH of a cat’s urine is too high, painful bladder crystals have a high chance of developing. Urine of a cat eating urinary cat food is often moderately acidic to prevent the development of struvite crystals. Struvite crystals do not grow well in acidic environments. In addition to supporting pH levels, the ingredients found in urinary tract diets for cats support a healthy coat, healthy skin, and a healthy digestive system.

Do Not Forget Water!

Although a prescription urinary cat food can significantly assist in your cat’s health, a good water intake is crucial in preventing problems to prevent conditions like feline urinary tract infections. Even with the prescription food, your cat can still develop urinary tract problems if he becomes dehydrated.

If you have any questions regarding urinary cat food, our in-house pet nutritionist is available to assist you.

Learn more here about urinary dog food!

Amber Johnson, Animal Behaviorist

Miss Amber Johnson has many years of experience with pets and is a licensed cat and dog nutrition and behavior specialist. She currently collaborates with PetPremium where she counsels clients in pet behavior and nutrition. The statements made in this article are the personal opinions of Miss Amber Johnson and based on independent experiences and could be different from the opinions of PetPremium Pet health Insurance or any other pet health insurance provider.

Homemade Dog Food: Do’s and Don’ts

Your dog is a large part of your family. As such, you want to ensure the best nutrition plan possible for your furry friend. This could mean making your dog homemade dog food. There are a few tidbits of information you need to understand in order to be successful in developing a healthy diet for your companion. What about people food as natural dog treats?

Homemade Dog Food

Homemade Dog Food Do’s

  • Feed him unprocessed foods!
  • Feed him plenty of meat. Raw meat, raw bones and animal fat are among the foods essential for a healthy diet.
  • Follow the homemade recipe exactly. For example, if the recipe calls for chicken with the skin still attached, removing the skin could significantly impact the diet planned for your dog.
  • Add supplements if necessary. Calcium is often not sufficient in a homemade diet. Dependent upon the needs of your dog, a supplement may be necessary for her to remain healthy!
  • Observe your dog once his diet switches! Keep a close eye on your dog for the first 2-3 weeks and ensure he is not gaining or losing a significant amount of weight. If he is gaining or losing, his diet will need altered.
  • Top 5 Foods for a Healthy Dog

Homemade Dog Food Don’ts

  • Do not feed him processed food or any of these bad foods for dogs.
  • Do not try to place your dog on a diet meant for an herbivore! Your dog is a carnivore and should be fed as such.
  • Do not feed processed dog treats. Most dog treats are full of chemicals, dyes and fillers which are not good for your dog.

If you have any questions regarding homemade dog food, our in-house dog food advisor is available to assist you. Learn more about organic dog food here.

Amber Johnson, Animal Behaviorist

Miss Amber Johnson has many years of experience with pets and is a licensed cat and dog nutrition and behavior specialist. She currently collaborates with PetPremium where she counsels clients in pet behavior and nutrition. The statements made in this article are the personal opinions of Miss Amber Johnson and based on independent experiences and could be different from the opinions of PetPremium Pet health Insurance or any other pet health insurance provider.

What You Should Know about Urinary Dog Food

Urinary dog food is designed for dogs who are at risk or have urinary tract disease. The veterinarian is likely to prescribe this type of food for you if he feels the need. There are several reasons for this food being prescribed when dogs have this problem.

Urinary Dog Food

Why Urinary Dog Food?

Your veterinarian is likely to prescribe this food due to the fact that it prevents and/or maintains urinary tract disease in dogs. Urinary dog food has a moderate amount of high-protein and low in fat. Fat holds uric acid in the kidneys and could harm your dog if an excessive amount is given. Urinary dog food is also low in purines which assist in the prevention of urinary stones in dogs. Purines metabolize uric acid in your dog’s body. Learn more about nutritional requirements for dogs.

This food has a lower level of magnesium than other dog foods. The levels of magnesium found in other dogs could potentially cause kidney stones or urinary stones in dogs which are dangerous and painful for your dog. The ingredients found in urinary diets for dogs also maintain a healthy immune system.

Do Not Feed Homemade

Homemade urinary dog food is possible; however, highly warned against by veterinary professionals. Why is this? Professionals warn against this due to the delicate levels described above in commercial urinary diets for dogs. It is extremely difficult to provide your dog with the correct formulation to remain at optimal health. Prescription diets are highly encouraged to ensure that your dog remains as healthy as possible. Find here recipes for 100% homemade dog summer treats.

If you have any questions regarding urinary diets for dogs or cats, our in-house pet nutritionist is available to assist you.

Amber Johnson, Animal Behaviorist

Miss Amber Johnson has many years of experience with pets and is a licensed cat and dog nutrition and behavior specialist. She currently collaborates with PetPremium where she counsels clients in pet behavior and nutrition. The statements made in this article are the personal opinions of Miss Amber Johnson and based on independent experiences and could be different from the opinions of PetPremium Pet health Insurance or any other pet health insurance provider.

Dealing with Puppy Anxiety

Puppy separation anxiety is often misunderstood by pet parents. Pet parents often mistake separation anxiety in puppies for destructive behavior. The most common form of puppy anxiety is puppy separation anxiety. Puppies hate separation and as such are likely to show signs of anxiety while you are away from them. This does not only occur when you leave the home but can also occur even if you walk into the next room.

Puppy Anxiety

Signs and Symptoms

Puppies who suffer from puppy separation anxiety are likely to soil the house, chew any available objects and bark excessively. This can be extremely frustrating to the pet parent. It is important to understand your puppy is not acting like this to spite you. Puppies are simply acting out their frustration.

Puppy Anxiety Treatment

Exercise is an excellent method to prevent or reduce separation anxiety in puppies. Restless puppies often exhibit more signs and symptoms of anxiety. Taking your puppy for walks and playing with your puppy will assist in reducing the unwanted behaviors.

You should never correct your puppy after the action has been done. For example, if you leave the home and your puppy has destroyed the home while you were gone, you should not correct your puppy at that moment. Your puppy will not understand the connection between the two. Catching your puppy in the act is crucial to prevention.

Avoiding a huge hello or goodbye will assist with your puppy’s separation anxiety. If you make leaving or arriving a big deal, your puppy is more likely to become stressed and act out on the stress. You can also leave a radio playing to reduce separation anxiety in puppies.

If you have any questions regarding puppy separation anxiety, our in-house pet behaviorist is available to assist you.

Amber Johnson, Animal Behaviorist

Miss Amber Johnson has many years of experience with pets and is a licensed cat and dog nutrition and behavior specialist. She currently collaborates with PetPremium where she counsels clients in pet behavior and nutrition. The statements made in this article are the personal opinions of Miss Amber Johnson and based on independent experiences and could be different from the opinions of PetPremium Pet health Insurance or any other pet health insurance provider.

Submissive Urination in Dogs: Medical or Behavioral?

Submissive urination in dogs is not uncommon as this is another form of communication to them. When a dog urinates in submission, he is portraying to you that he is not a threat to you. Most commonly, submissive urination in dogs occurs when they’re greeting unfamiliar people or animals or when they are being petted. This could range anywhere from a huge puddle to a few drips of urine.

Submissive Urination in Dogs

Posture

Submissive urination in dogs is also often accompanied by body language. Dogs who are urinating in submission to you often cower. They lower their body, tuck their tail and may have their ears back. This is to also inform the person or animal they are not a threat to them in any way.

Age and Breed

Puppies are more likely to show submissive behavior than adult dogs; although, it not uncommon for an adult dog to urinate in submission in various situations as discussed previously. Submissive urination is also more common in some breeds than others. For example, the English springer spaniel and Retriever breeds exhibit this behavior more often than other breeds.

Medical and Behavior

If your dog is urinating, it is crucial to first visit the veterinarian to rule out medical causes. There are many medical causes for urination such as urinary incontinence, change in diet, and urinary tract infections.

If the problem is not medical, behavioral causes may include improper house training, territorial marking or separation anxiety. Dogs who have not been house trained properly, especially if it is a new dog being introduced to your home, may have to re-learn or completely learn house training procedures. Dogs also may be marking their scent for territorial purposes to show other animals or people this is their territory and theirs alone. Separation anxiety is also a common cause of urination; your dog may be upset or nervous and urinate as a result.

If you have any questions regarding submissive urination in dogs, our in-house pet behaviorist is available to assist you.

Amber Johnson, Animal Behaviorist

Miss Amber Johnson has many years of experience with pets and is a licensed cat and dog nutrition and behavior specialist. She currently collaborates with PetPremium where she counsels clients in pet behavior and nutrition. The statements made in this article are the personal opinions of Miss Amber Johnson and based on independent experiences and could be different from the opinions of PetPremium Pet health Insurance or any other pet health insurance provider.

Dog Food for Diabetic Dogs: Special Diet Tips

Diabetes is extremely dangerous in dogs and as such, you should consult a veterinarian regarding dog food for diabetic dogs. The food your dog eats plays a large role in your dog’s treatment which is the reasoning for the veterinarian being best suited to determine which food to feed your dog. Food for diabetic dogs often includes medications and/or specific ingredients to keep your dog healthy.

Dog Food for Diabetic Dogs

Why Dogs Need It?

Diabetic dog food plays a large role in a dog’s well-being. Diabetic dog food helps your diabetic friend to maintain a healthy weight. As a diabetic dog, remaining the proper weight is crucial for proper health. A significant decline or incline in weight could severely impact your dog. In addition, diabetic dog food promotes urinary tract health and assists in supporting your dog’s immune system.

Diabetic Dog Food: How Does it Work?

How does diabetic dog food differ from other foods? Diabetic dog food is low in fat and calories and contains therapeutic L-carnitine. L-carnitine is an amino acid utilized in treating diabetes in dogs. It also contains a lower amount of magnesium and sodium. Finally, it is designed to regulate your dog’s blood glucose levels.

Learn more about pet diabetes here and if you have any questions regarding diabetic dog food, our in-house pet nutritionist is available to assist you.

Amber Johnson, Animal Behaviorist

Miss Amber Johnson has many years of experience with pets and is a licensed cat and dog nutrition and behavior specialist. She currently collaborates with PetPremium where she counsels clients in pet behavior and nutrition. The statements made in this article are the personal opinions of Miss Amber Johnson and based on independent experiences and could be different from the opinions of PetPremium Pet health Insurance or any other pet health insurance provider.

How to Train a Cat to Walk On a Leash Outdoors?

Walking your cat on a leash can open up opportunities for you and your feline friend to bond safely as you revel in the sights, sound and scents that nature has to offer. Acclimating your cat to the notion of strutting on a leash in the great wide open of outdoors must be pursued gradually to gain your cat’s acceptance and to ensure your cat’s safety.

Train a Cat to Walk On a Leash

Smart Shopper Selection

The first step in understanding how to train a cat to walk on a leash is to familiarize yourself with the safest necessary accessories. Never attach a leash to your cat’s collar, especially if the collar is one that is designed to break away when tugged. Your cat should be wearing a harness at all times when venturing out on a leash. When shopping for a harness for your cat, it is crucial that you purchase one that is specifically designed for use with cats and that is appropriately sized for your cat. Remember that your cat is flexible and quick. Impersonating Houdini will be a simple feat for your cat if it wants to free itself from a halter that was not designed with the agile cat in mind. When selecting the halter, be sure that the loop through which the leash will be fastened is positioned on the back of the cat’s body and not at the cat’s neck. You will also need to purchase a leash. Choose a leash that has a secure clasp, and avoid leashes that resemble chains. The weight and the sound of a chain leash may be off-putting to some cats.

Accepting the Harness

The first phase of how to train a cat how to walk on a leash is to gain the cat’s acceptance of the harness. Begin the training process by simply leaving the harness near the cat’s favorite napping spot or food bowl for a few days. This gives the cat the opportunity to sniff the new object and to become accustomed to its presence in a nonthreatening situation. Consider placing treats alongside of the harness each day so that the cat learns to associate something positive with it.

For the next step, place the harness on your lap and hold the cat on your lap. Let the cat sniff the harness, and try petting the cat with the harness in your petting hand. Always reward your cat with treats when contacts with the harness are positive. After a few days of this calm interaction, try outfitting the cat with the harness. It will be helpful to practice placing and securing the harness on a stuffed animal a few times before you attempt to put in on your cat so that you are more confident and that there is less struggle with the questioning cat as you grapple with figuring out how to position the harness.

Once the harness is on the cat, offer treats and allow your kitty to walk around indoors for a few minutes while wearing the new attire. If the cat appears stressed, remove the harness immediately and try again another day. Always work at the cat’s comfortable pace when training.

Learning to Love the Leash

When your cat reaches the point of being comfortable with strutting around the house in a harness, it is time to introduce the leash. Fasten the leash, and then allow your cat to walk around a closed room. Supervise the cat closely, but do not hold the leash at this stage. Allow the cat to drag the leash along the floor.

When the cat walks around with the attached leash with indifference, pick up the end of the leash and walk along with the cat. This should be done indoors until the cat is used to the activity. Throughout the training process, make the attempts daily, keep every attempt short in duration and reward all sessions with treats. Remember that walking a cat on a leash takes time and patience when training your cat to look forward to this practice.

Stepping Out

Once the cat is used to walking along with you while being tethered to you by a leash, it is time to make the transition outdoors. Start every outing with a treat as you place the harness on your cat, and conclude every outing with another treat after the two of you have returned indoors. Begin your outdoor walks within the safe confines of a fenced yard. For a cat that is used to walls and ceilings, stepping out into a vast, open space with new sounds and smells can be overwhelming and intimidating. Keep the walks brief and secure, allowing your cat to pause, sniff and explore the yard. As your cat becomes more comfortable with nature’s surroundings, gradually extend the lengths of the walks as you venture into new territory. Remember that walking your cat on a leash should be enjoyable for your cat.

Warnings

Some cats tend to be high strung by nature and may never accept the concept of wearing a harness or walking on a leash. It is imperative to respect the cat’s preferences and abandon the notion of talking outdoor walks together if your kitty is uncomfortable. Forcing the issue may be detrimental to your relationship and cause anxiety in your cat. As you begin the steps of how to train a cat to walk on a leash, observe your cat’s behavior closely and recognize if the activity is too stressful to your kitty.

Understand that although your cat resides indoors where it is safely tucked away from the perils of outdoors, walking a cat on a leash outside exposes your cat to potential loose dogs that you may encounter. Be prepared to quickly pick up your cat, and head home immediately before your cat becomes stressed if you observe a loose dog coming your way.

Your cat will also be at increased risk for contracting parasites, such as fleas, ticks and heartworm. If you plan to bring your cat outdoors, be sure to ask your veterinarian for a safe and effective preventative product to protect your cat from parasites.

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