Himalayan

The Himalayan originated in 1931. Clyde Keeler and Virginia Cobb had the intent of creating a Persian cat with the unique colorpoints of the Siamese. The resultant litter produced beautiful kittens with unique markings. In the 1950s, a Canadian cat breeder, Ben Borrett, wanted the same type of cat, but Borrett desired a long hair coat. The cats originally bred by Borrett were called colourpoint longhairs. It was in 1957 that American cat registries recognized the breed and named it a Himalayan.

The Himalayan is a large, cobby cat with short legs. This breed has an abundant furry coat that needs regular grooming. It also has wonderful blue eyes, a trait inherited from the Siamese. The Himalayan is an interesting combination of its ancestors. This can has the snub nose, small ears and large eyes of the Persian. It also has the heavy-bones, short body of the Persian. What it gets from its Siamese ancestry is its beautiful coat. You find Himalayans in a variety of colorpoints: blue, flame, lilac, and seal. You also see the gorgeous blue eyes of the Siamese cat in the Himalayan. Personality: This is a calm, tranquil cat that enjoys human companionship and likes to sit on people's laps. It's not a clingy cat though and is happy to sit on its own. It's not very playful and therefore is only moderately suitable for living with children, dogs or other cats. Himalayans are quite laid-back, much like their Persian counterparts. Lovingly nicknamed the “Himmy,” these cats are a favorite among fanciers across America. Although you will find one of these cats quietly playing with a toy, they much prefer to be sitting in their owner's lap being dutifully adored. Although the breed is a placid one, they do not do well with young children. Himalayans do not appreciate being chased or prodded, and they do best in homes with older children and adults.

Himalayan image
Origin
US, 1950s
Life Span
15-18 years
Other Names
Himalayan

Himalayan Build Information

Size
Large

The Himalayan is a large, cobby cat with short legs. This breed has an abundant furry coat that needs regular grooming. It also has wonderful blue eyes, a trait inherited from the Siamese. The Himalayan is an interesting combination of its ancestors. This can has the snub nose, small ears and large eyes of the Persian.

It also has the heavy-bones, short body of the Persian.

What it gets from its Siamese ancestry is its beautiful coat. You find Himalayans in a variety of colorpoints: blue, flame, lilac, and seal. You also see the gorgeous blue eyes of the Siamese cat in the Himalayan.

Behaviour and Personality

Kid Friendliness
Affection Level
Activity Level

This is a calm, tranquil cat that enjoys human companionship and likes to sit on people's laps. It's not a clingy cat though and is happy to sit on its own. It's not very playful and therefore is only moderately suitable for living with children, dogs or other cats. Himalayans are quite laid-back, much like their Persian counterparts.

Lovingly nicknamed the “Himmy,” these cats are a favorite among fanciers across America.

Although you will find one of these cats quietly playing with a toy, they much prefer to be sitting in their owner's lap being dutifully adored. Although the breed is a placid one, they do not do well with young children. Himalayans do not appreciate being chased or prodded, and they do best in homes with older children and adults.

Appearance

Grooming
High

Because these cats have longer hair, they require daily grooming. A stainless steel cat comb will make quick work of any budding mats in your cat's fur. Don't expect to be able to take a day off from grooming your Himalayan; ignoring your cat’s coat can lead to a matted mess that requires a shave down to get rid of. Himalayans are prone to staining around the eyes. Keep your cat's face clean with warm water and a face towel.

Clip your cat's nails once every four to six weeks.

You will also want to check your cat's ears once a week. If your cat will tolerate it, a daily tooth brushing can help stave off dental disease.

Breed's Talents and Facts

  • The Himalayan appreciates good mental stimulation in the form of play
  • Feeding your cat correctly will help to ensure that it does not become obese
  • You may have to wait for up to six months to purchase a kitten from a reputable breeder if you want a specific colorpoint
  • This breed of cat needs frequent brushing and occasional bathing, regular nail trimming and ear cleaning
  • The breed most similar to the Himalayan is the Persian
  • In fact, the two breeds are often confused by people who are unfamiliar with their differences

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Common Health Conditions in Himalayans

Himalayans are prone to polycystic kidney disease (PKD) and respiratory issues. Your cat is less likely to have these problems if you purchase it from a reputable breeder. These fanciers do not breed from stock known to have the conditions.

Himalayan Pet Insurance

When adding a dog or cat to your family you want to make sure your pet is happy, healthy and protected. During its lifetime your pet is exposed to many illnesses and diseases and some breeds are affected by a congenital disease which is a condition existing at birth. At these moments when your pet is ill or maybe needs surgery, you want to be protected for the unexpected and high veterinarian costs.

Insure your Himalayan

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